Act Now: E-Mail, Fax, or Mail President Obama and Congress About Tobacco Control Issues

Act Now: E-mail or send a fax or letter to President Obama about sending the WHO FCTC treaty (keep reading below for a description of the MPOWER objectives and the FCTC treaty) to Congress for ratification, or to support other anti-tobacco legislation. Click on the following link to do so:

Click here to let President Obama know your views on tobacco issues.

To make the process quick and easy, you’ll find sample text provided that you can modify any way you wish.

For the benefit of humanity, please take the brief amount of time needed, and e-mail President Obama about these issues.

Act Now: E-mail or send a fax or letter to your Senators or Representative to the U.S. House of Representatives to support ratification of the WHO FCTC treaty (keep reading below for a description of the MPOWER objectives and the FCTC treaty), or to support other anti-tobacco legislation. Click on the following link to do so:

Click here to let your Senators and Representative know your views on tobacco issues.

For the benefit of humanity, please take the brief amount of time needed and e-mail your Senators and Representative about these issues.

To make the process quick and easy, you’ll find sample text provided that you can modify any way you wish.

MPOWER

Current World Health Organization guidelines for tobacco control can be summarized using this acronym “MPOWER.”

Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies.
Protect people from tobacco smoke.
Offer help to quit tobacco use.
Warn about the dangers of tobacco.
Enforce bans on tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship.
Raise taxes on tobacco.

You can download the MPOWER report at: http://www.who.int/tobacco/mpower/package/en/index.html.

(Note: versions are available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French Russian and Spanish)

WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is the first treaty negotiated under the auspices of the World Health Organization. Adopted by the World Health Assembly on May 21, 2003 and entered into force on February 27, 2005, it has since become one of the most widely embraced treaties in UN history. To date, 164 Countries have ratified it. The U.S. signed it on May 10, 2004, but President Bush never sent it to Congress to ratify it. ( http://www.who.int/fctc/en/index.html.)

The WHO FCTC was developed to respond to the globalization of the tobacco epidemic. It’s an evidence-based treaty that reaffirms the right of all people to the highest standard of health. The Convention represents a milestone for the promotion of public health and provides new legal dimensions for international health cooperation.